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Quantitative research

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Qualitative Research

This video offers a side-by-side comparison of both methodologies including the characteristics, examples of research questions, data collection, data analysis and reporting. For example, a researcher may want to determine the link between income and whether or not families have health insurance. The methods will be highly structured and consistent during data collection, most likely using a questionnaire with closed-ended questions.

The results will provide numerical data that can be analyzed statistically as the researcher looks for a correlation between income and health insurance. Quantitative methodology would best apply to this research problem. A quantitative approach allows the researcher to examine the relationship between the two variables of income and health insurance.

The data can be used to look for cause and effect relationships and therefore, can be used to make predictions. Another researcher is interested in exploring the reasons that people choose not to have health insurance. This researcher wants to know the various reasons why people make that choice and what the possible barriers may be when people choose not to get insurance. This is an open-ended question that will not provide results that will lend themselves to statistical analysis.

Therefore, this an example where qualitative methods should be applied. The following table compares and contrasts key characteristics of qualitative and quantitative research and is useful in helping researchers evaluate their research problem.

Qualitative Research - When to Use Which? Qualitative and Quantitative Research - The link below is an overview of the two methods and describes when to choose each method. Introduction to Quantitative Research — The following PDF is an article that provides an introduction to quantitative research.

Large sample sizes are needed for more accurate analysis. Small scale quantitative studies may be less reliable because of the low quantity of data Denscombe, This also affects the ability to generalize study findings to wider populations.

The researcher might miss observing phenomena because of focus on theory or hypothesis testing rather than on the theory of hypothesis generation. Sophisticated software removes much of the need for prolonged data analysis, especially with large volumes of data involved Antonius, Quantitative data is based on measured values and can be checked by others because numerical data is less open to ambiguities of interpretation. Hypotheses can also be tested because of the used of statistical analysis Antonius, Doing quantitative research in the social sciences: An integrated approach to research design, measurement and statistics.

Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology , 3, 77— The strengths and weaknesses of quantitative and qualitative research: Journal of advanced nursing, 20 4 , The Good Research Guide: Handbook of Qualitative Research.

The discovery of grounded theory; strategies for qualitative research. Nursing research, 17 4 , Introduction to Social Research: Quantitatie and Qualitative Approaches. Research Methods Qualitative vs. Qualitative Research Qualitative research is empirical research where the data are not in the form of numbers Punch, , p.

Events can be understood adequately only if they are seen in context. The contexts of inquiry are not contrived; they are natural. Nothing is predefined or taken for granted. Qualitative researchers want those who are studied to speak for themselves, to provide their perspectives in words and other actions.

Therefore, qualitative research is an interactive process in which the persons studied teach the researcher about their lives. The qualitative researcher is an integral part of the data, without the active participation of the researcher, no data exists. In a nutshell, quantitative research generates numerical data or information that can be converted into numbers. Qualitative Research on the other hand generates non-numerical data.

Only measurable data are being gathered and analyzed in quantitative research. Qualitative research focuses on gathering of mainly verbal data rather than measurements.

Gathered information is then analyzed in an interpretative manner, subjective, impressionistic or even diagnostic. The primary aim of a Qualitative Research is to provide a complete, detailed description of the research topic.

It is usually more exploratory in nature. Quantitative Research on the other hand focuses more in counting and classifying features and constructing statistical models and figures to explain what is observed. Qualitative Research is ideal for earlier phases of research projects while for the latter part of the research project, Quantitative Research is highly recommended.

Quantitative Research provides the researcher a clearer picture of what to expect in his research compared to Qualitative Research. The researcher serves as the primary data gathering instrument in Qualitative Research.

Here, the researcher employs various data-gathering strategies, depending upon the thrust or approach of his research. Examples of data-gathering strategies used in Qualitative Research are individual in-depth interviews, structured and non-structured interviews, focus groups, narratives, content or documentary analysis, participant observation and archival research.

On the other hand, Quantitative Research makes use of tools such as questionnaires, surveys, measurements and other equipment to collect numerical or measurable data.

The presentation of data in a Qualitative Research is in the form of words from interviews and images videos or objects such as artifacts. If you are conducting a Qualitative Research what will most likely appear in your discussion are figures in the form of graphs.

However, if you are conducting a Quantitative Research, what will most likely appear in your discussion are tables containing data in the form of numbers and statistics. Qualitative Research is primarily subjective in approach as it seeks to understand human behavior and reasons that govern such behavior.

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Qualitative Methods Quantitative Methods Methods include focus groups, in-depth interviews, and reviews of documents for types of themes.

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Many times those that undertake a research project often find they are not aware of the differences between Qualitative Research and Quantitative Research methods. Many mistakenly think the two terms can be used interchangeably.

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Although there are a number of soft differences between the two types of methods, there is one very important buycoumadin.gqtative research is deductive and hinges on the presence of a hypothesis, which is identified before research begins. Qualitative research is inductive and does not require a hypothesis in order to start the research . Research methods are split broadly into quantitative and qualitative methods. Which you choose will depend on your research questions, your underlying philosophy of research, and your preferences and skills. Our pages Introduction to Research Methods and Designing Research set out some of the issues.

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Qualitative vs Quantitative Research. Here’s a more detailed point-by-point comparison between the two types of research: 1. Goal or Aim of the Research. The primary aim of a Qualitative Research is to provide a complete, detailed description of the research topic. It is usually more exploratory in nature. Research Methods; Qualitative vs. Quantitative ; Qualitative vs. Quantitative Research. By Saul McLeod, updated A good example of a qualitative research method would be unstructured interviews which generate qualitative data through the use of open questions. This allows the respondent to talk in some depth, choosing .