Skip Nav

What are the colors of the pH scale 0-14?

What Is PH Paper Used For?

❶Then allow the paper to dry. Gently mix the solution with a clean toothpick.

What Is Fluted Filter Paper?

Measuring pH with Litmus Paper
Navigation menu
Report Abuse

Danger red represents the color of acids on alkacid indicators. Less acidic solutions are orange or yellow while neutral solutions are gray to green. Basic or alkaline solutions are blues and purples. Your indicator strips should come with a color chart to match shades to pH values.

Each brand of pH test strips may have slightly different color schemes, but most utilize the visible rainbow spectrum of light. Litmus paper comes in two colors. Red litmus paper turns blue when exposed to a base. Blue litmus paper turns red in the presence of an acid. Litmus paper is of limited use since it only tells you whether you are dealing with an acid or base and gives no indication about strength. Another form of pH testing involves taking a test sample of water in a test-tube type container.

The directions for the liquid pH test generally require you to add a drop or two of the liquid into the water in the test tube. After shaking the tube, the liquid changes color, which you compare to a 0 to 14 pH chart to determine the acidity or alkalinity of the water.

The human body requires water to be 7 on the pH scale for good health. Carolyn Robbins began writing in Her work appears on various websites and covers various topics including neuroscience, physiology, nutrition and fitness. Robbins graduated with a bachelor of science degree in biology and theology from Saint Vincent College. By Carolyn Robbins; Updated April 30, Sometimes when two water molecules come together, a proton from one hydrogen atom leaves its water molecule and becomes part of another water molecule.

Only the positively charged proton moves; the negatively charged electron stays behind. This illustration shows the chemical equations that explain how water molecules can become ions and how ions can become water molecules again. Explain to students that the first chemical equation shows two water molecules coming together. Point out the chemical formula for each water molecule, H 2 O. The reason why the number of hydrogen atoms changed from two the subscript in H 2 to three the subscript in H 3 is because having an extra proton is like having an extra hydrogen atom, even though the electron did not come over with it.

Because one proton was added, there is one more proton than electrons, making this a positive ion. The reason why the number of hydrogen atoms changed from two the subscript in H 2 to one no subscript after the H means 1 hydrogen is because losing a proton is like losing a hydrogen atom. Because only the proton was transferred, there is one more electron than proton, making this a negative ion.

Explain to students that water molecules and ions are always colliding. At any given time in an ordinary sample of water, a small percentage of water molecules are transferring protons and becoming ions. Tell students that when an acid is added to an indicator solution, the acid donates protons to the water molecules. How do you think the color will change if you pour a small amount of each leftover solution into your universal indicator solution? Continue pouring small amounts of the acid and base solutions into your indicator until the solutions are used up.

The colors of the indicator solution will vary, but students should see that acids and bases mixed together cause the color of the indicator to change toward neutral. Have students describe what they did and their observations. Then explain that in Chapter 6, Lesson 9, they will combine acids and bases in an indicator solution with the goal of making the pH of the final solution neutral.

The American Chemical Society is dedicated to improving lives through Chemistry. Materials for the Demonstration 3 clear plastic cups Citric acid Sodium carbonate Universal indicator solution Water Note: Teacher Preparation Make indicator solution for student groups Make a dilute universal indicator solution for this demonstration and for each student group by combining mL water with 10 mL universal indicator solution.

Pour about 25 mL of this dilute universal indicator solution into a clean cup for each student group. Prepare for the Demonstration Pour about 50 mL indicator solution into a clear plastic cup for you to use in the demonstration. Do not tell students that you have added anything to the cups. Expected Results The citric acid turns the indicator from green to reddish. Reveal to students that you put something in the cups beforehand. Do you think this was a chemical reaction?

Why or why not? A color change is often a clue that a chemical reaction has taken place. So the color change in each cup is likely the result of a chemical reaction. This point is made in Chapter 6, Lesson 6. Would you say that the substances that were in the cups before the liquid was added were the same or different? The liquid in each cup turned a different color during the reaction. Because substances react chemically in characteristic ways and the substances reacted differently, the substances in each cup must be different.

Have students compare the color of the solutions made in the demonstration to the colors on the Universal Indicator pH Color Chart. Hold up the cups from the demonstration and ask the following questions: What does the color of the liquid in each cup tell you about the substance that was already in the cup when the indicator was added? The cup that turned reddish initially contained an acid, and the cup that turned purple initially contained a base.

What does the green color of the indicator tell you about the water in that cup? Is it acidic, basic, or neither? The green indicator left in the cup is neither acidic nor basic, so it must be neutral. Introduce the acid and base used in the demonstration and discuss how the color of universal indicator may change with other common acids and bases. Acids and Universal Indicator Solution Explain that citric acid is in citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, and oranges.

What are some other common examples of acids? Students might say that vinegar is an acid. You could point out that there are also stronger acids, like sulfuric acid used in car batteries. What colors would you expect to see if you placed any of these substances in universal indicator? The color may change to yellow, orange, or red for these acids. Bases and Universal Indicator Solution Explain that sodium carbonate is one of the chemicals commonly used in detergents made for dishwashing machines.

What are some other common examples of bases? Students may not know any examples of bases but you can tell them that soaps, ammonia, and other cleaners are often bases. The color may change to dark green, blue, and purple for any of these bases.

For universal indicator, the changes in color for bases are not as different as they are for acids. Give each student an Activity Sheet. Explore Have students prepare the solutions for the activity. Teacher Preparation Students will need small amounts of sodium carbonate and citric acid for the activity. Label two small plastic cups citric acid and sodium carbonate for each group.

Distribute the cups with universal indicator solution to each student group. Materials for Each Group 2 clear plastic cups 3 droppers Masking tape and pen or permanent marker Universal indicator in cup Water Graduated cylinder Sodium carbonate Citric acid 2 flat toothpicks Procedure Label your equipment Use masking tape and a pen to label one cup citric acid solution and another cup sodium carbonate solution. Make a citric acid solution Use your graduated cylinder to add 5 mL of water to the cup labeled citric acid.

Make a sodium carbonate solution Use your graduated cylinder to add 5 mL of water to the cup labeled sodium carbonate. Use a flat toothpick to pick up as much sodium carbonate as you can on the end of a toothpick. Explain what students will do in the next activity and discuss the purpose of having a control. Why is it important to have a control?

The control is left alone and not changed so that any color changes in the other wells can be compared to the original color in the control. Have students test increasing concentrations of citric acid solution. Question to Investigate How does the concentration of citric acid affect the color of universal indicator solution?

Materials for Each Group Universal indicator solution pH color chart Citric acid solution At least 6 toothpicks Spot plate 2 droppers Procedure Test your citric acid solution Use one of your droppers to nearly fill 6 wells in your first spot plate with the universal indicator solution. Record the color of the indicator, the number of toothpicks of citric acid, and the pH number in the chart on the activity sheet for well 2.

Expected Results The color of the indicator should turn yellow-green or yellow. Record Observations Help students fill out the chart on their activity sheet. Ask students to make a prediction: Procedure Test a more concentrated citric acid solution Add another toothpick scoop of citric acid to the citric acid cup.

Record the color of the indicator, the number of toothpick scoops of citric acid added, and the pH number in the chart for well 3. Continue adding toothpicks of citric acid and testing the solution in the last three wells to see how many different colors you can get.

Expected Results As the citric acid solution becomes more concentrated, the color should change to variations of yellow-green, yellow, yellow-orange, orange, orange-red, and red. The color and pH of different concentrations of citric acid Well Number Number of toothpicks of citric acid used in 5 mL of water Color pH 1 0 Green 7 2 1 Yellow-green 6. How does the color of the indicator solution change as the citric acid solution becomes more concentrated? As the citric acid solution becomes more concentrated, the color moves from green toward red on the pH color chart.

How does the number on the pH scale change as the concentration of citric acid solution increases? As the citric acid solution becomes more concentrated more acidic , the number on the pH scale decreases.

Have students test increasing concentrations of sodium carbonate solution. Question to Investigate How does the concentration of sodium carbonate affect the color of universal indicator solution? Materials for Each Group Universal indicator solution pH color chart Sodium carbonate solution At least 6 toothpicks Spot plate 2 droppers Procedure Test your sodium carbonate solution Use a dropper to nearly fill the 6 wells in your other spot plate with universal indicator solution.

You will not add anything else to the first well. Record the color of the indicator, the number of toothpicks of sodium carbonate used to make the solution, and the pH number in the chart for well 2. Expected Results The color of the indicator should turn green-blue or blue. Test a more concentrated sodium carbonate solution Add another toothpick of sodium carbonate to the sodium carbonate cup.

Add 1 drop of sodium carbonate solution to the next well. Record the color of the indicator, the number of toothpicks of sodium carbonate used, and the pH number in the chart for well 3. Continue adding toothpicks of sodium carbonate and testing the solution in the last three wells to see how many different colors or shades you can make. Expected Results The more concentrated sodium carbonate solution should cause the color to change to a darker blue moving toward purple.

How does the color of the indicator solution change as the sodium carbonate solution becomes more concentrated? As the sodium carbonate solution becomes more concentrated, the color moves from green toward purple on the pH color chart. How does the number on the pH scale change as the concentration of base increases? As the sodium carbonate solution becomes more concentrated more basic , the number on the pH scale increases. Explain Explain how water molecules interact with each other to form ions.

Project the animation Proton Transfer in Water. Play the first part of the animation. Project the illustration Water Molecules Trade Protons. Explain the reformation of two H 2 O molecules. Explain how acids and bases cause the indicator to change color. Project the animation Acids Donate Protons. Project the animation Bases Accept Protons. Extend Have students slowly pour their remaining acidic and basic solutions into the indicator solution to introduce the idea that acids and bases can neutralize each other.

Universal Indicator Paper

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

The pH scale runs from 0 to 14, with each number assigned a different color. At the bottom of the scale sits red, which represents the most acidic, and a dark blue at its opposite end represents 14 and alkalinity. In the middle zone, the pH scale becomes neutral. Milk .

Privacy FAQs

A pH indicator is a halochromic chemical compound added in small amounts to a solution so the pH of the solution can be determined visually. Hence, a pH indicator is a chemical detector for hydronium ions or hydrogen ions in the Arrhenius model. Normally, the indicator causes the color of the solution to change depending on the pH. Indicators can also show change in other physical properties; for .

About Our Ads

Hydrion Insta-Chek pH Paper, the ultimate in wide range, general purpose pH papers has a distinct color match at each full pH unit:[][][][][][][][][][][][][][]/5(). pH and Color Change. Key Concepts. Whether a solution is acidic or basic can be measured on the pH scale. When universal indicator is added to a solution, the color change can indicate the approximate pH of the solution. Acids cause universal indicator solution to change from green toward red.

Cookie Info

Apr 02,  · The pH scale is the range of pH values from 0 to The paper that indicates the complete range of pH value from 0 to 14 is called the universal indicator. pH paper is a strip of filter paper that is soaked in universal indicator and then dried. You can follow the rise in pH with a colour chart, or you use universal indicator paper or a pH meter instead of the universal indicator solution. (2) Starting with cm 3 of a dilute hydrochloric acid solution, add powdered calcium oxide (lime) or calcium hydroxide (slaked lime) in small portions at a time.